Latest issue

$9.90

Our latest issue is here! Put your feet up and enjoy learning about new topics, like our introduction to biodynamics and the debate around hydroponics in organics.
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Read a case for eating meat ethically, from health to environmental impact; a breakdown of “degrowth”, the concept of living with less; and another feature of wild edibles you can use in the kitchen, this time looking at the pretty daylily. There’s heaps to unpack for home gardeners with our summer gardening tips and maramataka calendar, too.
Mauri ora, grab a copy and dig in!
What’s inside the November December 2022 issue:
  • Eco-friendly period products for all
  • Introduction to Biodynamics: ecological, ethical, and holistic perspectives
  • Maramataka for Whiringa-ā-rangi and Hakihea: November and December
  • Delicious recipes from Christall Lowe, including a hāngī and strawberry iceblocks

See the full contents list below!

 

Description

Organic NZ November/December 2022

Features

  • Edible legacy: Jared Hiakita talks about syntropic food forests and establishing resilient kai systems for his community
  • A case for eating meat: Bonnie Flaws shares her reasons for being an ethical omnivore
  • Degrowth: Ger Tew talks about living with less

Gardening

  • Thought for food: Diana Noonan shares seasonal growing tips for the warmer months
  • Introduction to Biodynamics: Rebecca Reider demystifies the organic farming system based on ecological, ethical and holistic principles
  • Maramataka for Whiringa-ā-rangi and Hakihea: November and December by Liliana Clarke

Health and food

  • Kai is love: Christall Lowe inspires us with recipes for an oven-cooked hāngī, strawberry “toppa” iceblocks and ginger horopito kisses with raspberry cream
  • Daylilies: Herbalist Sara Mertens on the tasty culinary possibilities and medicinal properties of hemerocallis
  • Eco-friendly period products: From menstrual cups to period underwear and reusable pads you can make yourself, Claire Brunette investigates planet-conscious options

Farming and horticulture

  • Hydroponics – can it count as organic? Pete Huggins makes a case for the importance of defining organics
  • Humus is dead – long live maom! Charles “Merf” Merfield gets to the root of the matter on soil health

Regulars

  • Editorial; Things we like; From the world of organics; Meet the locals; Subscriptions; Explaining organics; Book reviews; Competitions; Community garden; Digging up the past